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Friday

26

May 2017

Hope Reflected | Timeliness

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timeliness God's timing

Timeliness

If you garden, you know that during the early days of Spring, it can prove a challenge to know the right timing for tasks that need to be completed. This year, I questioned the right time to trim back the rose bushes. Wes wondered about the ideal time to re-seed the lawn. Together, we’re still debating where several annuals should be planted throughout the garden. Timing is everything.

The timing you’re struggling with may not be related to gardening; maybe you’re waiting to hear back about that job application, or perhaps you’re waiting and wondering why you’re single when it seems as though all your friends are getting married and starting a family, or maybe you’re questioning the inconvenience of a recent health challenge.

Timing is everything.

  1. There is a time for everything. “He has made everything beautiful in its time.” (Ecclesiastes 3:11) Chances are that even if you haven’t read the book of Ecclesiastes, you’ve likely heard the famous song by The Byrds called, “Turn! Turn! Turn!” where we hear that, “To everything (turn, turn, turn) there is a season (turn, turn, turn),” and it’s true. There is a season and a time for everything. Happiness. Sadness. Love. Heartache. Health. Sickness. Life. Death. The important thing to remember is that God is in control, and it’s God Who has a perfect timing for everything.
  2. Sometimes (OK most of the time), our timing is not the best. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the LORD. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.” (Isaiah 55:8-9) Have you ever been held up in a traffic jam, feeling frustrated that you’re going to be late? Or have you ever hesitated to make a decision, only to make your choice and find out that the house is off the market/tickets are sold out/position has been filled? We think we’ve got it all together, and we’ve got everything planned out perfectly (according to us) in our minds, however the reality often is that God’s timing is not our timing (and written from experience, God’s timing is ALWAYS the best).
  3. Ultimately, our timing is in God’s hands. “My times are in your hand.” (Psalm 31:15a) Whether or not you’re a Christian, God is in control. God is omniscient (read: He knows everything), and He makes no mistakes. That can be a hard truth to accept, especially when things aren’t going the way I want them to. Frequently, I have to catch myself when things aren’t going my way, and remind myself that God’s timing is greater than anything I could ever imagine. Jesus Himself said in John 13:7, “What I am doing you do not understand now, but afterward you will understand.”
  4. We can trust in God’s timing. “And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.” (Romans 8:28) Trust can be difficult, especially if you’ve been hurt before, however when you have a relationship with Jesus Christ, He will never let you down. “The LORD is good to those who wait for him, to the soul who seeks him. It is good that one should wait quietly for the salvation of the LORD.” (Lamentations 3:25-26)

God’s timing is perfect. You may think you know the right time for everything, but remember what Elisabeth Elliot said: “God never denies us our heart’s desire except to give us something better.” If you’re questioning the timing of something in your life, keep in mind that God frequently answers our prayers in one of three ways: With a “yes”, with a “not yet”, or with “I have something better in mind.”

 

Originally published as “Timeliness.” Minto Express, Independent Plus, Arthur Enterprise-News, Mount Forest Confederate. April 27, 2017: 7. Print. Web.

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Friday

19

May 2017

Hope Reflected | This old house

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this old house romans road

This Old House

Wes and I have a couple of good friends who are in the midst of a serious reno on a home they purchased earlier this year. By serious reno, I mean completely gutting the interior of the house and stripping it down to its bare bones, leaving only the exterior shell, and re-building it from the inside out. It’s quite an undertaking, especially considering the risks involved with renovating an old home. When you buy an older home, you don’t know what you’re going to encounter. At an initial glance, the home may look like it’s in relatively good condition – possibly needing some new flooring and a fresh coat of paint – but when you get in there and actually investigate further, looking under the surface, sometimes you realize that your reno needs a whole lot more attention than those surface details.

All this talk of renos really got me thinking –  isn’t that just like us? On the outside, so often we appear to have it all together, while on the inside, we’re struggling. We put on airs like we’ve got everything under control, while the reality is the complete opposite. We’re all in desperate need of a Saviour.

Only Jesus can wash away our sins and make us white as snow. To put it in laymen’s terms, only the Lord can do a complete reno on your insides, and give you that clean slate you’ve been searching for. Maybe you’re wondering, “How can I, with everything going on in my life and all the bad decisions I’ve made, actually get a fresh start?” There is a way!

  1. We must acknowledge God as the Creator of everything, and acknowledge our shortcomings. For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse, because, although they knew God, they did not glorify Him as God, nor were thankful, but became futile in their thoughts, and their foolish hearts were darkened.” (Romans 1:20-21) Try as we might, without God, we’re nothing. We were created by Him, and created to glorify Him.
  2. Admit that we are all sinners, and we are all in desperate need of forgiveness. “For all have sinned, and fall short of the glory of God.” (Romans 3:23) We’re not worthy of God’s love and forgiveness, and nothing we can do can make us worthy.
  3. Acknowledge that God provided us with His Son, and that He is the only way to eternal life. “But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8) We’ve all heard John 3:16, “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son…”. God loves us so much, that He was willing to give the life of His only Son as the ultimate sacrifice for our sins.
  4. Accept that it is only by asking forgiveness of our sins and claiming Christ as our Lord and Saviour that we will have eternal life. “For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 6:23) There’s only one way to Heaven. It’s not by good works, it’s by believing in Jesus Christ as our Lord and Saviour and trusting Him.
  5. Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, and you will be saved. “That if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. For with the heart one believes unto righteousness, and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.” (Romans 10:9-10) There’s one reason that we celebrate Easter each year; Resurrection Sunday, when Christ was raised from the dead!
  6. Recognize that a personal relationship with Christ, not religion or ritual, is the only way to be saved. “For whoever calls on the name of the LORD shall be saved.” (Romans 10:13) Many people confuse rituals and “religion” with the personal relationship that Christians have with Christ. The truth is, making Christ the Lord of your life is the only way you’re guaranteed eternal life.
  7. Realize that a personal relationship with Christ starts in your heart. “For of Him and through Him and to Him are all things, to whom be glory forever. Amen.” (Romans 11:36) Good works won’t get you to Heaven. That being said, when you have a personal relationship with Christ, you’ll be inspired to live in a way that is honouring to Him, and this includes good works. It all starts in your heart.

Ready to walk the Romans road and get your own spiritual renovation under way? Follow the steps above; God loves you, and He is waiting for you!

Originally published as “This old house.” Minto Express, Independent Plus, Arthur Enterprise-News, Mount Forest Confederate. April 20, 2017: 7. Print.

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Monday

15

May 2017

Hope Reflected | Grace and Mercy: Two sides of the coin

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grace and mercy

Grace and Mercy: Two sides of the coin

You check into a nice hotel, and the hostess behind the desk gives you a free upgrade to a better room. Rather than staying in a basic room, you’re now enjoying the evening in a luxury suite. This is an example of grace – you’re receiving something that you don’t deserve and you didn’t do anything to earn.

You’re driving down the highway doing more than 100km in an 80km zone and you get pulled over. Rather than hit you with a ticket for speeding, the police officer who pulls you over lets you off with a warning. This would be an example of mercy – you’re not getting what you really deserve.

There are several examples of grace and mercy that each of us experience in life, but by far the most powerful examples of grace and mercy that we could ever experience are those that come to us from God.

Millard Erickson once said, “God’s mercy is His tenderhearted, loving compassion for His people. It is His tenderness of heart toward the needy. If grace contemplates humans as sinful, guilty, and condemned, mercy sees them as miserable and needy.”

It is interesting to note that grace is mentioned 170 times in the Bible, and mercy is mentioned 273 times. Grace is defined as God’s unmerited favour. Mercy, on the other hand, is defined as not getting what we truly deserve.

So how can we take these godly traits and exercise them in each of our own lives? We’re humans, so our human nature often makes it difficult for us to display grace and mercy to others, because neither attribute comes naturally to us.

  • We can demonstrate grace through our words. “Let your speech always be with grace, seasoned with salt, that you may know how you ought to answer each one.” (Colossians 4:6) As Christians, we are called to season our speech with salt and to speak with grace. This can be so hard, am I right?! Sometimes it seems like it’s easier to complain, to talk about that person behind his or her back, or to let our frustrations out through our words. Demonstrating grace means exercising caution and kindness when we’re speaking to others. It means using language that is edifying and words that build up, rather than words that insult or tear down.
  • We can demonstrate mercy through our actions. “Therefore be merciful, just as your Father also is merciful.” (Luke 6:36) Maybe someone’s done you wrong, or thrown you under the bus. Your immediate instinct – and mine – is to react. But, that immediate reaction, is it to show mercy to your offender? If you’re anything like me, the answer is probably not. When someone acts out against you and is a total jerk, a good rule of thumb is to take a breath. Wait a while before you respond to that email, stay silent until you’re prepared to provide a level-headed answer. Rather than react in the same manner as your offender, react with mercy and you’ll be surprised with how it goes over (see Proverbs 25:22). Remember, resolution over retaliation!

Living a life filled with grace and mercy isn’t always easy; on the contrary, because these two godly traits don’t come naturally to us, we must rely on our Heavenly Father to live and practice grace and mercy. It’s only because of God’s own grace and mercy that we can even begin to exhibit these traits. As sinners, we are condemned and deserve God’s wrath, but by His grace, He saved us, and in His mercy He has granted us eternal life. God’s grace is immeasurable, and God’s mercy is inexhaustible. The best part? God’s grace and God’s mercy are available to anyone who chooses to believe in Christ as their personal Saviour.

 

Originally published as “Grace and Mercy: Two Sides of the Coin.” Minto Express, Independent Plus, Arthur Enterprise-News, Mount Forest Confederate. April 6, 2017: Web.

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Thursday

11

May 2017

Monday

8

May 2017

Hope Reflected | Wisdom | 5 Characteristics of the Wise

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wisdom 5 characteristics of the wise

Wisdom | 5 characteristics of the wise

“Be very careful, then, how you live – not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity, because the days are evil.” (Ephesians 5:15-16) Defined as the “capacity of judging rightly in matters relating to life and conduct; soundness of judgment in the choice of means and ends; sometimes, less strictly, sound sense, especially in practical affairs,” wisdom has been sought after for ages.

The word wisdom is used 234 times throughout the Bible (54 times in the book of Proverbs alone). Wisdom is an incredibly important virtue that is imperative to living a fulfilling and godly life. People often confuse wisdom with knowledge when in fact the two are completely different. Knowledge is the gathering and learning of facts and information while wisdom is understanding which of those facts and pieces of information are true, and how those facts and information apply to one’s life. Ironically, Jimi Hendrix described the difference like this: “Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens.”

As Christians, we are called to seek after wisdom and pursue it. Throughout the Bible we read of several examples of wise – and unwise – men and women and the role that wisdom – or a lack thereof – played in each one of their lives. There are several telltale characteristics of a wise person:

  1. Wise people heed instruction. “A wise son heeds his father’s instruction, but a scoffer does not listen to rebuke.” (Proverbs 13:1) Wise people accept constructive criticism and grow from it; they listen to the advice of their elders who’ve “been there and done that”. As my Mum once told me, “You can learn from your mistakes, or you can learn from the mistakes of others and then choose not to make the same mistakes yourself.” Wise people consider, and follow instruction. “Listen to counsel and receive instruction, that you may be wise in your latter days.” (Proverbs 19:20).
  2. Wise people listen. “A wise man will hear,” (Proverbs 1:5), “The way of fools seems right to them, but the wise listen to advice.” (Proverbs 12:15) If you’re wise, you’ll take the time to listen. The struggle is real, am I right?! Sometimes everything in me wants to speak when really what I need to do is listen. If you’re struggling to listen, remember the old adage: “If you seek wisdom, be silent.” “Even a fool is counted wise when he holds his peace.” (Proverbs 17:28).
  3. Wise people plan ahead. “Every wise woman buildeth her house: but the foolish plucketh it down with her hands.” (Proverbs 14:1) You’ve likely heard of the virtuous woman described in Proverbs 31. In Proverbs 14:1 we’re told of the wise woman who builds her house. At the time this Proverb was written, women were very involved in the managing and planning of their husbands’ estates (for more on this, read Proverbs 31). Whether you’re a woman or a man, if you’re living wisely, you’re working your best to provide for your family, to improve their lives, not just for now, but for the future as well.
  4. Wise people encourage one another. “The lips of the righteous feed many: but fools die for want of wisdom.” (Proverbs 10:21) The book of Proverbs is filled with examples of guarding your tongue and thinking before you speak. Wise people encourage, exhort, and uplift those around them. They build others up rather than tear them down. They act with discernment and want to have good relationships (see also Proverbs 11:12).
  5. Wise people work hard and save. “Through wisdom is an house builded; and by understanding it is established.” (Proverbs 24:3) You build up for yourself and for your family through wise and prudent management, and by working diligently. Proverbs 10:4-5 says, “He who has a slack hand becomes poor, but the hand of the diligent makes rich. He who gathers in summer is a wise son; he who sleeps in harvest is a son who causes shame.”

There are so many characteristics of people who are wise, perhaps most especially that they consistently pursue that very virtue. Charles Spurgeon once said that wisdom is “the right use of knowledge.” Use your knowledge to discern what is truly important in this world, and eternity. If you’re searching for wisdom, ask God. “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, Who gives to all liberally and without reproach, and it will be given to him.” (James 1:5)

Originally published as “Wisdom | 5 characteristics of the wise.” Minto Express, Independent Plus, Arthur Enterprise-News, Mount Forest Confederate. March 16, 2017: 7. Print.

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Monday

1

May 2017

Hope Reflected | 5 Reasons You Should Read the Bible

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5 reasons to read the Bible Hope Reflected

5 reasons you should read the Bible

One of the best pieces of advice I’ve ever received was to read my Bible everyday. Even if it was only a Psalm or Proverb, picking up God’s Word each day is just as important as eating. In fact, the Bible is food for the spirit. Without it, our spirits will starve. Just as you wouldn’t go driving off across the country without your GPS (or map if you’re old-school), neither should you start each day without first feeding from the Bible. The Bible is a compass for our spirits and nourishment for our souls.

2 Timothy 3:16 tells us that “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness.” You may think the Bible’s not for you, or it’s not relevant for where you’re at in life or what you’re going through. On the contrary! More than any self-help book or how-to guide, the Bible is factually, historically, and scientifically correct and without error. If you’re wondering what the Bible could possibly do to help you, check this out:

  1. The Bible provides practical answers to life’s questions. “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, Who gives to all men liberally and without reproach, and it will be given to him.” (James 1:5) Where do I turn when my heart is broken? Check out Psalm 34:18. What should I do when someone has hurt me? Read Matthew 6:14-15. Why does it seem like nothing I do is ever good enough? See Galatians 6:9. Where can I go to get help for my marriage? Head on over to Ephesians 5:22-33. What should I do when I’m worried? Read Philippians 4:6. I could go on. God’s Word is the place where you’ll find all the answers that you need.
  2. The Bible provides strength and encouragement. “He giveth power to the faint; and to them that have no might He increaseth strength.” (Isaiah 40:29) Strength is mentioned more than 360 times throughout the Bible. King David relied on God’s Word for strength throughout his life, and even said as much in Psalm 119:28: “My soul melteth for heaviness: strengthen thou me according unto thy word.” If you’re looking for strength and encouragement, the Bible is filled with amazing truths that will strengthen and encourage you. A great place to start is in the book of Psalms or Proverbs.
  3. The Bible provides proper perspective, clarity, and focus. “The entrance of Your words gives light; it gives understanding to the simple.” (Psalm 119:130) In some versions the word entrance is defined as unfolding; when you take the time to unfold and open God’s Word, He’ll provide you with proper clarity and focus. Reading the Bible is a great way to reflect, and the Bible provides you with the proper focus. Getting into God’s Word as the start to your day will put your mind in the right place to face the issues of the day; getting into God’s Word before you go to bed at night will clear your mind and help you sleep.
  4. The Bible provides instruction and correction. “Blessed is the man whom You instruct, O LORD, and teach out of Your law, that You may give him rest from the days of adversity.” (Psalm 94:12) If you’re looking for a guide for your moral compass, the Bible is it. God’s Word provides instruction and guidelines on every topic, from child-rearing and best business practices to managing your finances and maintaining healthy relationships. The Bible also provides correction – be prepared when you read the Bible that it’s not for the faint of heart (see Proverbs 15:32). The Bible tells the truth, and calls wrong wrong and right right.
  5. The Bible provides the truth. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made. In Him was life, and the life was the light of men. And the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.” (John 1:1-5) There is no other “holy” book out there that contains the scientifically or historically accurate facts that the Bible does. Don’t believe it? Look at the scientific calculations in the Bible, review the detailed prophecies shared in the Bible, and check the historical accounts that the Bible details. All the details are accurate. The Bible is truth.

In essence, the Bible is God’s love letter to you and I. It shares of this world being created, how you and I came to be, and how God sent His only Son to die on the cross to save you and I from our sins. Whether you like it or not, you and I are the clay; He is the potter (Isaiah 64:8). When you take the time to get into God’s Word, He’ll speak to you through it. Don’t take my word for it; read the Bible for yourself! “For the Word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the division of soul and spirit, and of joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart.” (Hebrews 4:12)

Originally published as “5 reasons you should read the Bible.” Minto Express, Independent Plus, Arthur Enterprise-News, Mount Forest Confederate. March 23, 2017: 8. Print.

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Monday

27

March 2017

Encouragement | Isaiah 45:2

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make the crooked places straight

“I will go before thee, and make the crooked places straight: I will break in pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars of iron.” (Isaiah 45:2)

In the New American Standard version of the Bible, Isaiah 45:2 is translated, “I will go before you and make the rough places smooth…”; in the English Standard version of the Bible, “I will go before you and level the exalted places…”; in the New International Version, “I will go before you and will level the mountains”.

It’s an encouragement to know that we serve a God Who will make the crooked places straight, make the rough places smooth, level the exalted places, and level the mountains.

Having that kind of strength and power before us, behind us, and within us is a huge comfort. Whatever crooked or rough places you face, whatever exalted places, whatever mountains are in your way, trust God. He will be the One to make your way straight, smooth, and level.

“I will go before thee, and make the crooked places straight: I will break in pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars of iron.” (Isaiah 45:2)

 

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Friday

24

March 2017

Hope Reflected | The power of the tongue

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power of the tongue james 3:8

The power of the tongue

One thing that we all have in common is that at some point or another, each one of us, – inevitably, – is going to say something we don’t mean. You may make a comment in the middle of an argument, or maybe it will be something you say behind someone’s back, or perhaps you’ll speak words to someone that just don’t come out right. Or, as Wes experienced this past week, you may say something about a complete stranger that you instantly regret. The tongue. At some point in each one of our lives, our tongues are going to hurt someone else and cause us trouble.

The problem with the tongue is that once you say something, you can’t take it back. James 3:5 tells us, “Even so the tongue is a little member and boasts great things. See how great a forest a little fire kindles!” We all need to learn how to guard our tongues and watch our mouths.

There’s the old saying that goes, “God gave us mouths that close and ears that don’t so that should tell us something.” It’s so true, isn’t it? How often we speak words in haste when really we should be just as quick to listen. I write that quickly, like it’s no big deal and easy to do, when the reality is more often than not quite different. I struggle at least a couple of times a day to listen when everything in me wants to interrupt. It’s like, sometimes when someone else is speaking and telling me something, the time I should be spending listening to them, I’m actually formulating my response to them in my head. That’s not right. We are called to be “quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath.” (James 1:19) Don’t underestimate the power of the tongue.

  1. Once you say it, you can’t take it back. “There is one who speaks like the piercings of a sword, but the tongue of the wise promotes health.” (Proverbs 12:18) Like the toothpaste leaving the tube analogy, once you speak words, you can’t “un-speak” them. That’s why it’s so important to consider our words before saying them aloud.
  2. Actions speak louder than words. “Let us not love in word or in tongue, but in deed and in truth.” (1 John 3:18) There’s the saying that goes, “You can preach a better sermon with your life than with your lips.” The way you live is just – or more – important than the words you speak. There is no such thing as a part-time Christian. Living a life that is pleasing to God happens every day of the week, every where, – whether you’re in the barn or in the office, – authentic Christian living does not just happen on Sundays while you’re in church.
  3. Take a step back; give it some time. “He who guards his mouth preserves his life, but he who opens wide his lips shall have destruction.” (Proverbs 13:3) If you’re anything like me, sometimes you just need to take a step back before you react. I’ve learned the hard way – and learned several times, actually – that in the heat of the moment is the wrong time to hit the ‘send’ button on that reactive email or to say something out of spite. Usually, the best practice is just to sleep on it. Give yourself some time to cool off before you answer anyone in a heated tone. “Even a fool is counted wise when he holds his peace.” (Proverbs 17:28)
  4. It’s never too late to apologize and ask forgiveness. “’Yet even now,’ declares the LORD, ‘Return to Me with all your heart.” (Joel 2:12) In earthly terms, words can be forgiven but not forgotten. But God, when we truly repent, He forgives and God has the ability to wash our slate clean and make us white as snow. If we’re truly reflecting a life lived for Him, we’ll seek forgiveness to those we’ve wronged through our words (and our actions). It’s never too late to seek forgiveness, and you might be surprised how well received a sincere apology will be.

Proverbs 18:21 reminds us that “death and life are in the power of the tongue, and those who love it will eat its fruit.” James 3:7-8 shares that “For every kind of beast and bird, of reptile and creature of the sea, is tamed and has been tamed by mankind. But no man can tame the tongue.” It may be small, but the tongue is a mighty weapon. May each of our words speak love and truth.

 

Originally published as “The power of the tongue.” Minto Express, Independent Plus, Arthur Enterprise-News, Mount Forest Confederate. March 9, 2017: 8. Print.

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Monday

20

March 2017

Encouragement | Isaiah 30:15

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in quietness and in confidence encouragement isaiah 30:15

 

“For thus saith the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel; In returning and rest shall ye be saved; in quietness and in confidence shall be your strength.” Isaiah 30:15

If you’re like me, sometimes (OK, a lot of times) you have the tendency to speak out, to get the last word in, and to be the authority on the issue of the day.

That’s why I love the gentle reminder of Isaiah 30:15 “In quietness and in confidence shall be your strength.”

So often throughout God’s Word, we read of examples of men and women who, by the world’s terms, weren’t strapping and strong, but rather were humble, had a teachable spirit, and were quick to listen (rather than quick to speak). I’m reminded of the fact that it’s in the stillness of our souls that we become strong. It’s not when we’re trying to be tough, getting out there and talking back, or being of an argumentative spirit that God uses us; no, it’s when we have a quiet spirit that God speaks through us most. It’s when we’re ready to rest in Him that He will use us.

This week, while everything in me wants to challenge and to be strong, I need to remember that I can do that best when I am quiet and confident in my Heavenly Father and His strength alone.

“For thus saith the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel; In returning and rest shall ye be saved; in quietness and in confidence shall be your strength.” Isaiah 30:15

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Wednesday

15

March 2017

Wednesday Wisdom | Living Slowly

Written by , Posted in Hope Reflected, Wednesday Wisdom

living slowly wednesday wisdom

“Everywhere, people are discovering that doing things more slowly often means doing them better and enjoying them more. It means living life instead of rushing through it. You can apply this to everything from food to parenting to work.” Carl Honoré

I’ve long been a fan of Carl Honoré’s insight into the slow movement; he comes at the topic from a place of practicality, and believes in the value of moving more slowly.

Where are you today? Rushing through work, sending off a series of emails, or trying to complete as many things as possible off your to-do list before the end of the day?

Time is a hot commodity and often we spend so much of our energy trying to jam as many activities into our limited time that we lose sight of the things that really matter. We even practice daylight savings time in an effort to give ourselves more daylight hours to get things done!

Wes and I were talking last night about how in some cultures, there is beauty in slowness. Life, when it’s not muddied by our modern-day “conveniences” (smart phones, internet, fast cars) becomes something that we can appreciate, and even enjoy.

Is the stress that rushing brings really worthwhile? Is pushing through a task just to complete it really better than taking the time it deserves to be done right? Does eating fast make my dinner taste better than if I actually took the time to taste it? The answer to all of these questions, is no.

“Everywhere, people are discovering that doing things more slowly often means doing them better and enjoying them more. It means living life instead of rushing through it. You can apply this to everything from food to parenting to work.” Carl Honoré

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