Hope Reflected

Encouragement and Hope from God's Word

stormy seas Archive

Wednesday

26

January 2022

Surviving the storm, part 2

Written by , Posted in Christian Living, Published Work

How many times in the storm do we miss shelter because we don't petition the very One who calms the storm we are stuck in? | Read more about surviving the storm on hopereflected.com

In the storm, how can we remember the presence of God?

Spurgeon said, “The Christian is made strong and firmly rooted by all the trials and storms of life.” We can only be made strong and firmly rooted when our foundation is sure. After the disciples call out to Christ, “saying, Lord, save us: we perish.” (Matthew 8:25), Jesus questions them, “Why are ye fearful, O ye of little faith?” (Matthew 8:26). For the Christian, fear and faith cannot coexist. Ultimately, one will overpower the other. Matthew Henry wrote, “How imperfect are the best of saints! Faith and fear take their turns while we are in this world; but ere long, fear will be overcome, and faith will be lost in sight.”

The very One who calms the storm

Jesus then “…arose, and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a great calm.” (Matthew 8:26). How many times in the storm do we miss shelter because we don’t petition the very One who calms the storm we are stuck in? “Hear my cry, O God; attend unto my prayer.” David wrote in Psalm 61:1-4. “From the end of the earth will I cry unto thee, when my heart is overwhelmed: lead me to the rock that is higher than I. For thou hast been a shelter for me, a strong tower from the enemy. I will abide in thy tabernacle for ever: I will trust in the covert of thy wings. Selah.” When it storms, birds protect their babies from the wind and rain by covering them with their wings. God, in His great care for us, does the same, offering us shelter under the cover of His loving arms. Does our cry come unto Him first, or do we exhaust our own devices and strength before seeking His shelter?

"Hear my cry, O God; attend unto my prayer... For thou hast been a shelter for me, a strong tower from the enemy." (Psalm 61: 1, 3) | Read more about surviving the storm on hopereflected.com

In the midst of the storm, God is still in control

Sometimes this is hard to believe, but it is true. In His timing, He will arise, and He will rebuke the winds and sea that are tossing us about. We need only “Be still” and rest in the knowledge that He is in control (Psalm 46:10). When someone is stuck in the water, or in danger of drowning, the worst thing they can do is to panic. But that’s our human instinct. We fight to keep our head above the waves, we struggle to swim. It seems senseless to try to remain still and breathe deeply even though these are two of the ways that can help us stay afloat. We are instructed throughout the Bible to “Be still,” (Psalm 46:10), to “rest in the Lord and wait patiently for him,” (Psalm 37:7). Even in the midst of the storm when it doesn’t make sense, we need to “Trust in the Lord with all thine heart, and lean not on thine own understanding.” (Proverbs 3:5).

“But the men marveled, saying, What manner of man is this,

that even the winds and the sea obey him!”

Matthew 8:27

When we’re tempted to worry, may we marvel instead that the One who controls the winds and the sea cares for us. “But the men marveled, saying, What manner of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him!” (Matthew 8:27). The bigger God is to us, the smaller the storm will seem.

Originally published as “Surviving the storm, part two.” Independent Plus. September 16, 2021: 5. Print. Web.

Read part one of Surviving the storm here.

Monday

24

January 2022

Surviving the storm, part one

Written by , Posted in Christian Living, Published Work

"God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; Though the waters thereof roar and be trouble, though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah." (Psalm 46:1-3) | Read more about surviving the storm on hopereflected.com

Storms can make us ask all kinds of questions

“Why would a good God allow this to happen to me?”

“What is the point to this?”

“Where do I go from here?”

“How did I get here?”

“Who would have ever thought this would happen?”

Storms have a way of making us wax existential and ask some serious questions of our Creator.

The disciples had questions too, after they ended up in a great storm whilst traveling with Jesus. "Master, carest thou not that we perish?" (Mark 4:38). Read more of surviving the storm on hopereflected.com

The disciples had questions too

The disciples had questions too after they ended up in a great storm whilst traveling with Jesus.

“Master, carest thou not that we perish?” (Mark 4:38).

What a question to ask, especially on the heels of the miracles Jesus had just performed, healing a leper, a centurion’s son, and even Peter’s mother-in-law! One would think that by witnessing Christ’s healing power firsthand that the disciples would have no doubt of His love for them, and yet, they asked, “Master, carest thou not that we perish?”

Be prepared for rough waters

We can learn so much from the accounts of Jesus calming the storm in Matthew 8, Mark 4, and Luke 8. When we follow Christ, we ought to be prepared for rough waters. “And when he was entered into a ship, his disciples followed him.” (Matthew 8:23).

If we’re following Christ because we think by doing so we’ll be exempt from troubles, think again! Before the disciples followed Him on to the ship, what did Jesus say? “Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.” (Matthew 7:14).

Following Christ is not for the faint of heart.

Troubled waters need not trouble us, because God is a very present help in any kind of trouble. Read more of surviving the storm on hopereflected.com

Comfort in the storm

What a comfort that God is not worried about the storms that we’re going through. God is not worried about the waves washing on board our ships. “And, behold, there arose a great tempest in the sea, insomuch that the ship was covered with the waves: but he was asleep.” (Matthew 8:24). God already knows what we are going through.

The Psalmist wrote in Psalm 46:1-3, “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled, though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah.” Troubled waters need not trouble us, because God is a very present help in any kind of trouble.

“Troubled waters need not trouble us, because God is a very present help in any kind of trouble.”

Hope Reflected

Charles Spurgeon famously said, “I have learned to kiss the waves that throw me up against the Rock of Ages.” In the midst of the storm, are we coming to the only One who can save us?

“And his disciples came to him, and awoke him, saying, Lord, save us: we perish.” (Matthew 8:25). He hears our petitions; He wants us to come to Him! We should never let the presence of a storm cause us to doubt the very presence of God.

Originally published as “Surviving the storm, part one.” Independent Plus. September 9, 2021: 5. Print. Web.

Thursday

7

October 2021

Sent into stormy seas

Written by , Posted in Christian Living, Published Work

Even the most experienced among us will at times struggle through the storm. The disciples at least kept rowing; do we? | Read more at hopereflected.com

“And straightway Jesus constrained his disciples to get into a ship, and to go before him unto the other side, while he sent the multitudes away.” (Matthew 14:21)

When we read the account of Jesus walking on the water, we usually focus on the miracle itself, and Peter’s attempt to come meet Him. We don’t always consider how the disciples got out into the storm-tossed sea in the first place.

After the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand, Jesus instructed His disciples to get into a ship and to go before Him to the other side of the sea. “And straightway Jesus constrained his disciples,” we read in Matthew 14. Other versions of the Bible say that Jesus “made the disciples” get in the ship (NIV), and that Jesus “insisted” that His disciples go on before Him (MSG). Our all-knowing God sent His disciples out into the sea when He knew there was a storm coming and that the water would be rough. God is not surprised by the storms that we encounter, or by any clouds under which we’re living that just seem to keep lingering and pouring on us day after day.

"And he saw the toiling in rowing; for the wind was contrary to unto them:" (Mark 6:48a) | Read more of Sent into stormy seas on hopereflected.com

The disciples weren’t inexperienced boaters

These were men among whom were true fishermen, making their living on the water. They would have been accustomed to unsettled waters and known how to handle the ship when it was “tossed with waves” (Matt. 14:24). We read in Mark however that Jesus saw the disciples “toiling in rowing,” (Mark 6:48). Even the most experienced among us will at times struggle through the storm. The disciples at least kept rowing; do we? Joseph Benson wrote, “Though the wind was contrary, and they were tossed with the waves, yet being ordered by their Master to the other side, they did not tack about and come back again, but made the best of their way forward.”

How do we make the best of the way forward when we’re in the middle of the storm?

Like the disciples, we keep pressing on. When the disciples were stuck on the sea in the storm, “they willingly received him into the ship” (John 6:21). It’s integral as we keep going to draw on the Lord’s strength, that we willingly receive Him into our ship. Relying on our own strength will only lead to self-destruction. 

"Though the wind was contrary, and they were tossed with the waves, yet being ordered by their Master to the other side, they did not tack about and come back again, but made the best of their way forward." Joseph Benson | Read more of Sent into stormy seas on hopereflected.com

“The world can create trouble in peace,

but God can create peace in trouble.”

Thomas Watson

Puritan preacher Thomas Watson said that “If God be our God, He will give us peace in trouble. When there is a storm without, He will make peace within. The world can create trouble in peace, but God can create peace in trouble.” When we’re being tossed about in the heart of raging waters and stormy seas, to say it’s hard to keep our focus on Him rather than the waves is an understatement. And yet, this is what we are called to do. In the middle of the storm, God says to us, “Be of good cheer: it is I; be not afraid.” (Matt. 14:27). He who sends us into stormy seas will provide a way through.

Originally published as “Sent into stormy seas.” Independent Plus. May 13, 2021: 5. Print. Web.